Stonebird : an Alphabet for Carers

(This is an extract from my forthcoming book : "Severe ME : Notes for Carers")

A  

Ask: if you do not know what to do, ask the person at an appropriate time or    
    whoever the person agrees you can ask. Avoid panic. 

 Awareness: develop a conscious awareness of the person and their needs. Be aware of how your every sound, movement action impacts the person.

 Attention: pay attention to the smallest details. Pay attention to any signals the person may be giving our non- verbally as well as verbally.

 Advocacy: if you are asked to advocate for the person, make sure you accurately and adequately represent them.



Be careful: it is easy to make a mistake. Every action can lead to catastrophe potentially, if done wrongly.

Be bold in your actions and believe in yourself as a carer. Get it right.

Believe in the person and accept their illness, even if you do not fully understand it, is essential to providing good care.

C  

Care enough to really learn all you can about the person's needs and issues, so that you can care safely for the person, even when communication is difficult or impossible.

Concern yourself with the health and well-being of the person so that you can notice changes in energy and ability to tolerate your presence and the help needed.

 Consciously carry out your actions and care tasks so that accidents and mistakes do not occur and so that you are aware of how the person is in any moment.

Remain calm, even if a problem or crisis arises. Calmness aids right action. 

Creative solutions are often needed as needs are complex and answers not always obvious or easy to find.

Be cautious in your actions around a hypersensitive person, especially when you are getting to know them. Only do what you are asked.

Perform tasks confidently, as fear or anxiety can lead to mistakes and uncertainty.
     
D   

.... NEW BOOK COMING SOON !!!!

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